800 799 9830

Chestnut Honey

Chestnut Honey

Chestnut Honey is for the serious honey lover: dark, dense, and bitter with woody aromas of hay and bark, and a strong tannic finish. It’s loaded with pollen, mineral salts and tannins, and very low in acidity which gives it its unique pungency. Its bold flavor is matched by a rich dark brown color reminiscent of molasses.

Honey is the ultimate embodiment of terroir: specific flora from the bees’ local environment gives each honey its distinctive flavor, viscosity, and color, so the resulting product is truly reflective of place. This Chestnut Honey is made by bees feeding in chestnut forests high up in the Apennine mountain range between Tuscany and Emilia-Romagna. This intense Chestnut Honey has a uniquely Tuscan character—void of sweetness with a persistent dark cocoa finish.

First introduced thousands of years ago from Sardis (today’s Turkey), the chestnut tree (Castanea sativa), a cousin of beeches and oaks, is common throughout Europe. At one time it was called “Sardininian Nut,” and is now simply called “chestnut.” For millennia the nut served as a staple food for people living in the mountainous regions of Italy, taking the place of grains and potatoes in many dishes due to its high carbohydrate content.

To enjoy Chestnut Honey, serve it as an accompaniment to fresh cheeses (like Stracchino or Ricotta), over ripe blue cheeses (like Gorgonzola Dolcelatte), or drizzle over Pecorino Toscano and sliced fresh pears. It is also ideal in or on gelato: substitute Chestnut Honey for sugar in a basic vanilla gelato recipe or drizzle over vanilla ice cream for a stunning flavor contrast. Try featuring it in a meaty main—drizzle over porchetta, or use as a glaze for any grilled or roast chicken, duck or pork.

Read More about this Product on Our Blog

Sweet Italian Delights to Pair with Cheese

Description

Chestnut Honey is for the serious honey lover: dark, dense, and bitter with woody aromas of hay and bark, and a strong tannic finish. It’s loaded with pollen, mineral salts and tannins, and very low in acidity which gives it its unique pungency. Its bold flavor is matched by a rich dark brown color reminiscent of molasses.

Honey is the ultimate embodiment of terroir: specific flora from the bees’ local environment gives each honey its distinctive flavor, viscosity, and color, so the resulting product is truly reflective of place. This Chestnut Honey is made by bees feeding in chestnut forests high up in the Apennine mountain range between Tuscany and Emilia-Romagna. This intense Chestnut Honey has a uniquely Tuscan character—void of sweetness with a persistent dark cocoa finish.

First introduced thousands of years ago from Sardis (today’s Turkey), the chestnut tree (Castanea sativa), a cousin of beeches and oaks, is common throughout Europe. At one time it was called “Sardininian Nut,” and is now simply called “chestnut.” For millennia the nut served as a staple food for people living in the mountainous regions of Italy, taking the place of grains and potatoes in many dishes due to its high carbohydrate content.

To enjoy Chestnut Honey, serve it as an accompaniment to fresh cheeses (like Stracchino or Ricotta), over ripe blue cheeses (like Gorgonzola Dolcelatte), or drizzle over Pecorino Toscano and sliced fresh pears. It is also ideal in or on gelato: substitute Chestnut Honey for sugar in a basic vanilla gelato recipe or drizzle over vanilla ice cream for a stunning flavor contrast. Try featuring it in a meaty main—drizzle over porchetta, or use as a glaze for any grilled or roast chicken, duck or pork.

Read More about this Product on Our Blog

Sweet Italian Delights to Pair with Cheese

Product Details

Product CodeUnit SizeUnit / CaseCase WeightUPC CodeNotes
63001 250 gr/8.8 oz 6 3.6 kg/8 lb 7-93232-63001-4

Wholesale Pricing

Related Products

  • Acacia Honey

    Acacia honey is extremely light colored, almost white with golden yellow-green hues. The nose is delicately floral, fruity, and persistent....

  • Acacia Honey with Black Truffles

    The Lunardi brothers of Al Dolce Forno in Quarrata (located a few miles down the hill from Tenuta di Capezzana) have taken advantage of their...

  • Millefiori Honey

    “Milleflori” (thousand flowers) is also often called wildflower honey. This is both the most common type of honey and also, in a sense,...